5x12 pentomino tiling

Pentominoes

A pentomino is a polyomino composed of five congruent squares, connected along their edges (which sometimes is said to be an orthogonal connection).

There are twelve different free pentominoes. Ordinarily, the pentomino obtained by reflection or rotation of a pentomino does not count as a different pentomino.

I discovered pentominoes as a nerdy kid, probably when I read one of Martin Gardner's books based on his "Mathematical Games" columns in "Scientific American". Many of them are still available and I recommend them to anyone who has a mathematical mind (or whose children have).

The logo at the top of each of my pages is one example of a 5x12 tiling of free pentominoes and the the strip at the bottom is repeated copies of a 3x20 tiling.

Pentominoes tiled in various ways

The logo and strip are derived from the above work by a Wikipedia contributor and are used under a Creative Commons licence. See here for the gory details.

Wiblog:
25 Years

25 years ago today is the date Beth and I have deemed that we started going out. I say that as it's complicated. We met online, on the CIX BBS in the landrover conference, and so in 1996 we were early to discover the thing that people online have continued to find since: that long distance relationships are tricky. Beth lived in Ipswich, I lived 130 miles away in Yateley on the other side of London.  read more ...

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A Quite Impossible Proposal: How Not to Build a Railway by Andrew Drummond First Among Sequels by Jasper Fforde

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Word of the Day:
phonocentrism